36 Dramatic Situations

Thity Six dramatic

Creative writing for movies begins with a small idea or a motivational thought that has evoked any emotions into the mind of a screenwriter. Movies are nothing but emotions that are been transformed into a visual form with the use of characters, music, dialogues etc., through various mediums of communication. Composed with numerous departments and stages within film making, the writing stage requires at most involvement and dedication. Writing for a movie or a novel begins with one small concept that arise a question based on the motivation of the writer. These are the dramatic questions that will develop an entire story based on the genre in the process of scriptwriting.

Since the beginning of the Theatre era and evolution of the Film industry till the present generation of digital film making or any other art form of Storytelling, the concepts and basic ideas always revolve around the basic interrogation that arise as the major dramatic question. These questions are the motivational facts that manage the magnitude of the story. Based on a thorough study about Film appreciation and Script analyzing, a French writer Georges Polti had sorted out a list of dramatic questions and released a book by the end of 19th Century, which is been followed till date. He has sorted out this list as a continued study of Carlo Gozzi, an Italian Playwright. “The Thirty-six Dramatic Questions” is a detailed list to categorize the dramatic questions that occurs in a story. It is been proved by the many ace film makers and screen writers that a story can never be written with an idea excluding the 36 Dramatic Situations.

The Dramatic questions are as follows.

1. Supplication (The Book of Esther – 2013 Based on the book)
2. Deliverance (The Terminator – 1984)
3. Vengeance of a crime (Most of the Detective crime movies)
4. Vengeance taken for kindred upon kindred (The Lion King - 1994)
5. Pursuit (The Fugitive – 1993)
6. Disaster (The Birds – 1963)
7. Falling prey to cruelty or misfortune (Schindler’s List – 1993)
8. Revolt (A tale of two cities – 1958)
9. Daring enterprise (Saving Private Ryan – 1998)
10. Abduction (Helen of Troy – 1956)
11. Enigma (Seven – 1995)
12. Obtaining (Forrest Gump – 1994)
13. Enmity of kinsmen (Kramer vs Kramer – 1979)
14. Rivalry of kinsmen (Legends of the Fall – 1994)
15. Murderous adultery (Diabolique – 1996)
16. Madness (Psycho – 1960)
17. Fatal imprudence (A river runs through it – 1992 – Based on a Semi Auto-biographical book)
18. Involuntary crimes of love (Oedipus The King – 1967)
19. Slaying of a kinsman unrecognized (Oedipus The King – 1967)
20. Self-sacrificing for an ideal (Joan of Arc – 1948)
21. Self-sacrifice for kindred (Cyrano de Bergerac 1950 – Based on a French Play)
22. All sacrificed for a passion (Leaving Las Vegas – 1995)
23. Necessity of sacrificing loved ones (Abraham and Isaac – Characters based on true events depicted in Quran)
24. Rivalry of superior and inferior (Rocky – 1976)
25. Adultery (The Bridges of Madison County – 1995)
26. Crimes of love (The Apostle – 1997)
27. Discovery of the dishonor of a loved one (Redeeming Love – 1916 – Based on Novel)
28. Obstacles to love (Pretty Woman – 1990)
29. An enemy loved (Romeo and Juliet – 1968 – Based on the Novel by William Shakespeare)
30. Ambition (Jerry Maguire – 1996)
31. Conflict with a god (Rosemary’s Baby – 1968 – Based on a Novel)
32. Mistaken jealousy (Othello 1951 – Based on the Novel by William Shakespeare)
33. Erroneous judgment (Body Heat – 1981)
34. Remorse (Crime and Punishment – 1935)
35. Recovery of a lost one (The Deep end of the Ocean – 1999 – Based on a Novel)
36. Loss of loved ones (Love Story – 1970)

- VIKRAM KUMAR. B
(SCRIPT WRITER)- D'fine art

 

“Stakes” in Scriptwriting

stakes-scriptwriting

It’s really a challenging task to stay innovative in the aspects that we do on an everyday basis. Especially being in a creative department, it is mandatory to stay unique with our ideas and innovations. The simple and the most spectacular way is to think out of the box.

We shall take about “Stakes”.

As a writer, while writing a situation I always ask myself, “What if”. This phrase helps me in thinking out of the box. Especially in writing a screenplay. In the process of screenwriting, after I write a Linear format of the story, I have to ask myself a question “What If” to make the story more interesting. For instance, If the hero of the story needs to have more complication that will help the magnitude of the screenplay to increase which helps to hold the grip of the entire story.

So, the stakes make me get an idea which is entirely out of the way. But the stake should work out with the theme and the motivation. When many numbers of versions of the scripts are written and it’s been revised for a lot of times, we get to know where we need to apply the stakes and in which character we can bring into. This is also applicable in introducing a scene, shot or a dialogue. A story gets a new dimension when we apply stakes into a screenplay. If you could revise a lot of Blockbuster movie screenplays, you could witness the stakes been applied. This should have helped the screenplay to be more interesting and engaging for the audience.

A writer should never comprise to write numerous numbers of versions of his script to get various dimensions applying stakes that will help the story stand ahead of others assumption. The more you scribble, the more the screenplay gets engaging.

The dramatical questions never change. ’But the answers’. They have been changing for ages. And we still look for some different answers every day. Answers are nothing but ‘Solutions’. And questions are nothing but the ‘Conflicts’ – The basic formula to work on scriptwriting.

- VIKRAM KUMAR. B
(SCRIPT WRITER)- D'fine art

Creating Comfort Zones

creating-comfort-zones

Inspiration is profusely available in various forms all over the world and also from social media. In order to look for what your looking for is to know where to look for. Not as tricky as it sounds!

What’s important is to be able to translate the personality and desire while designing the zone and the space available. Indulge yourself with our truly inspirational designs, interact with the creators and build a beautiful and authentic space to comfort yourself in.

Comfort is and always gonna be one's deep desire. Depending upon the space and one's comfort, we at Dfine art are here to create and thus change the ordinary to extra-ordinary. There's no paucity of styles and designs at our door. Creation of visually appealing spaces requires styling, designing and blending of the right elements viz: finishes, colors, patterns and material leading to the successful implementation of the concept.

Allow us to transform your luxurious apartments to beautiful and comfortable spaces while you sit back and relax! To take you through a virtual tour of your designed spaces and for them to be executed as seen!

Send in your requirements and start the tour now.

Priyata Kothari
Sr. Interior Designer at Dfine art

Script Writing

script-writing

Movies are emotions that have been transformed into visuals by the use of characters and film making aspects. A good movie is the one which has evoked the emotions into the audience creating an impact. Cinema has evolved over the decades in its way and film making has drastically changed embracing with integrating technology. The art of film making begins with the imagination of a story or a basic idea that has popped out of our emotions. A basic idea is elaborated into a script and it is been conceived as a movie. The script writing is the important part of a movie during when we compose the entire script of the movie with the actions, dialogues and all other aspects which we want to visualize during the shooting stage of the movie. The art of scriptwriting includes more attention and detailing with respect to the motivation of the story, theme and the logline. If there is no strong motivation or a lagging logline, the entire script gets collapsed and so does the movie. Each and every dramatic conflict in the scenes is built up with the motivation combined with the basic plot of the movie which will allow improving the magnitude of each and every scene in a chain reaction. The three act structure is mostly used format by most of the script writers as it allows the writer to understand where to start and stop the plot and also to ensure the magnitude of the screenplay. The first act of the screenplay makes the writer to introduce the characters and the entire atmosphere that will take the audience to the world of the story and the call to adventure for the main lead. The second act narrates how the hero struggles in facing the adventure and how he finds out a solution to get rid of his discomfort zone. The third act is the climax and catharsis where the script ends conveying the moral of the story. The three act structure is based upon the theory stated by Aristotle, in which the three acts are divided into four parts. The more number of drafts we write will improvise the script with better actions and dialogues of a scene. A writer should allow himself to revise the scripts many times that will make him to understand the flow of the screenplay.

The universal format used by the writer avoids much confusion which helps in creating script reports and schedules in an easier way. Apart from the three act structure, a writer can also follow the principle of ‘The Hero’s journey’ which was written by Joseph Campbell based on the three act play departure, initiation and return. These formats of scriptwriting help a new writer to focus on the script without deviating away from the plot and the basic logline.

Script Writing – The Three Act Play

Script Writing

The art of scriptwriting includes more attention and detailing with respect to the motivation of the story, theme and the logline. If there is no strong motivation or a lagging logline, the entire script gets collapsed and so does the movie. Each and every dramatic conflict in the scenes is built up with the motivation combined with the basic plot of the movie which will allow improving the magnitude of each and every scene in a chain reaction. The three act structure is a frequently used format by most of the script writers as it allows the writer to understand where to start and stop the plot and also to ensure the magnitude of the screenplay.

The first act of the screenplay makes the writer to introduce the characters and the entire atmosphere that will take the audience to the world of the story and the call to adventure for the main lead. The second act narrates how the hero struggles in facing the adventure and how he finds out a solution to get rid of his discomfort zone. The third act is the climax and catharsis where the script ends conveying the moral of the story. The three act structure is based upon the theory stated by Aristotle, in which the three acts are divided into four parts.

The universal format used by the writer avoids much confusion which helps in creating script reports and schedules in an easier and professional way. Apart from the three act structure, a writer can also follow the principle of ‘The Hero’s journey’ which was written by Joseph Campbell based on the three act play - departure, initiation and return. These formats of scriptwriting help a writer to focus on the script without deviating away from the plot and motivation.

The more number of drafts we write will improvise the script with better actions and dialogues of a scene. A writer should allow himself to revise the scripts many times that will make him to understand the flow of the screenplay with respect to the magnitude.