Script Writing – The Three Act Play

Script Writing

The art of scriptwriting includes more attention and detailing with respect to the motivation of the story, theme and the logline. If there is no strong motivation or a lagging logline, the entire script gets collapsed and so does the movie. Each and every dramatic conflict in the scenes is built up with the motivation combined with the basic plot of the movie which will allow improving the magnitude of each and every scene in a chain reaction. The three act structure is a frequently used format by most of the script writers as it allows the writer to understand where to start and stop the plot and also to ensure the magnitude of the screenplay.

The first act of the screenplay makes the writer to introduce the characters and the entire atmosphere that will take the audience to the world of the story and the call to adventure for the main lead. The second act narrates how the hero struggles in facing the adventure and how he finds out a solution to get rid of his discomfort zone. The third act is the climax and catharsis where the script ends conveying the moral of the story. The three act structure is based upon the theory stated by Aristotle, in which the three acts are divided into four parts.

The universal format used by the writer avoids much confusion which helps in creating script reports and schedules in an easier and professional way. Apart from the three act structure, a writer can also follow the principle of ‘The Hero’s journey’ which was written by Joseph Campbell based on the three act play - departure, initiation and return. These formats of scriptwriting help a writer to focus on the script without deviating away from the plot and motivation.

The more number of drafts we write will improvise the script with better actions and dialogues of a scene. A writer should allow himself to revise the scripts many times that will make him to understand the flow of the screenplay with respect to the magnitude.